Archive for the ‘Award and Notable List Spotlights’ Category

Gifts for Readers? Try some of the Best of Lists – 2010

Saturday, December 11th, 2010
Salon.com – Best Fiction 2010
  • Room by Emma Donoghue
  • A Visit From the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan
  • Freedom by Jonathan Franzen
  • Faithful Place by Tana French
  • Super Sad True Love Story by Gary Shteyngart
Time Magazine – Top 10 Fiction Books
  • Freedom by Jonathan Franzen
  • A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan
  • Skippy Dies by Paul Murray
  • The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet by David Mitchell
  • Lord of Misrule by Jaimy Gordon
  • Wilson by Daniel Clowes
  • Matterhorn by Karl Marlante
  • How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe by Charles Yu
  • The Passage by Justin Cronin
  • Faithful Place by Tana French
Publisher’s Weekly – Best Books of 2010
Note: There are 100 books on this list (fiction and nonfiction); the top ten are listed below.
  • A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan
  • Freedom by Jonathan Franzen
  • Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
  • The Surrendered by Chang-rae Lee
  • The Big Short by Michael Lewis
  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
  • Just Kids by Patti Smith
  • Man in the Woods by Scott Spencer
  • The Lonely Polygamist by Brady Udall
  • The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson
The New York Times – The Best Books of 2010 (fiction)
  • Freedom by Jonathan Franzen
  • The New Yorker Stories by Ann Beattie
  • Room by Emma Donoghue
  • A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan
  • Selected Stories by William Trevor
Amazon.com – Editors’ Top 10: Literature & Fiction
  • Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes
  • Freedom by Jonathan Franzen
  • To the End of the Land by David Grossman
  • The Imperfectionists by Tom Rachman
  • Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson
  • The Hand That First Held Mine by Maggie O’Farrell
  • Skippy Dies by Paul Murray
  • One Day by David Nicholls
  • Memory Wall by Anthony Doerr
  • The Lonely Polygamist by Brady Udall
Barnes and Noble Best of 2010 (fiction)
Note: There are 25 books on this list; the first 10 are listed below.
  • To the End of the Land by David Grossman
  • The Surrendered by Chang-rae Lee
  • The Wake of Forgiveness by Bruce Machart
  • Freedom by Jonathan Franzen
  • Great House by Nicole Krauss
  • Super Sad True Love Story by Gary Shteyngart
  • How to Read the Air by Dinaw Mengestu
  • Bitter in the Mouth by Monique Truong
  • Faithful Place by Tana French
  • Matterhorn: A Novel of the Vietnam War by Karl Marlantes
Quill & Quire Magazine – Books of the Year 2010 (fiction)
  • Room by Emma Donoghue
  • Annabel by Kathleen Winter
  • Beatrice & Virgil by Yann Martel
  • Light Lifting by Alexander MacLeod
  • Ilustrado by Miguel Syjuco
  • The Death of Donna Whalen by Michael Winter
  • Curiosity by Joan Thomas
  • The Sky is Falling by Caroline Adderson
  • Bloom by Michael Lista

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Robert F. Sibert Medal – Teen Award Spotlight

Wednesday, June 23rd, 2010
Teen Award Spotlight – The Robert Sibert Medal for best informational book.
The Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award is awarded annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished informational book published in English during the preceding year. Established in 2001 by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), with support from Bound to Stay Bound Books, Inc., of Jacksonville, Illinois, the award honors Sibert, a long-serving president of Bound to Stay Bound Books.
June Teen Giveaway
Make sure to enter Bibliobabe’s June Teen Giveaway – for a chance to win An American Plague by Jim Murphy.

You can find the complete list of winners in:

The complete list of Robert Sibert Medal winners can be found on page 127 of Read, Remember, Recommend for Teens: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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Borders Original Voices Award for Fiction – Award Spotlight

Wednesday, June 9th, 2010
Award Spotlight – Borders Original Voices Award for Fiction
The annual Original Voices Awards, presented by Borders Group, Inc., recognizes “fresh, compelling, and ambitious works from… new and emerging talents.” Books chosen for the Original Voices program may be “innovative and inspiring new books from first-time authors” or “works that represent a new direction for established authors.” In a typical year, more than 100 works from contemporary authors and illustrators are spotlighted through monthly in-store features. In December, finalists for the awards are selected via an online vote of corporate and store employees. A committee of employees reads each finalist in the four categories—fiction, nonfiction, young adult, and children’s picture books—and names the winners. Each winner receives $5,000 from Borders and winning books are featured in 500 U.S. stores.

The Calligraphers’ Daughter by Eugenia Kim is the most recent Borders Original Voices winner (2009) and Bibliobabe’s June Fiction Giveaway. The complete list of Borders Original Voices winners can be on page 87 of Read, Remember, Recommend: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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Edgar Allan Poe Awards – Teen (and fiction) Award List Spotlight

Wednesday, May 19th, 2010
Each Wednesday, Bibliobabe spotlights an award or notable reading list. These lists are comprised of fiction and YA awards and important book lists, all part of the Read, Remember, Recommend reading journals. For past spotlights, click here.

This week’s spotlight is on the Edgar Allan Poe Awards presented by The Mystery Writer’s of America. Make sure to enter the Teen Giveaway – the Edgar Allan Poe Young Adult Book Winner!
The Mystery Writers of America “is the premier organization for mystery and crime writers, professionals allied to the crime writing field, aspiring crime writers, and folks who just love to read crime fiction.” Each April the organization awards ceramic statuettes of Edgar Allan Poe, known as “Edgars,” for outstanding contributions to mystery, crime, and suspense writing. The awards are to honor the best in mystery fiction, nonfiction, television, film, and theater and are widely acknowledged to be the most prestigious awards in the genre. Books, movies and TV shows based in mystery, crime, suspense, and intrigue fields are eligible.
Below is a list of the current award winners in book or story categories:


Novel
The Last Child
by John Hart


First Novel
In the Shadow of Gotham
by Stefanie Pintoff


Paperback Original
Body Blows
by Marc Strange


Critical/Biographical
The Lineup
edited by Otto Penzler


Fact Crime
Columbine
by Dave Cullen


Short Story
“Amapola” – Phoenix Noir
by Luis Alberto


Young Adult
Reality Check
by Peter Abrahams


Juvenile
Closed for the Season
by Mary Downing Hahn


Mary Higgins Clark
Awakening
by S.J. Bolton

You can find the complete list of winners in:

The complete list of Edgar Allan Poe winners in the Young Adult category can be found on page 79 of Read, Remember, Recommend for Teens: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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Books by Teens for Teens – Teen Notable List Spotlight

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010

Each Wednesday, Bibliobabe spotlights an award or notable reading list. These lists are comprised of fiction and YA awards and important book lists, all part of the Read, Remember, Recommend reading journals. For past spotlights, click here.
This week’s spotlight is on the Books by Teens for Teens list, created by the Appleton Public Library (WI).
Did you know Christopher Paolini was only fifteen years old when he started writing Eragon? Ashley Darrow was just barely a teenager (thirteen) when she wrote Beneath Minuela’s Bed. And the famous Mary Shelley, creator of Frankenstein, was nineteen when she penned her enduring gothic novel. S. E. Hinton, popular author of The Outsiders, was a sophomore in high school when her novel was picked up by Viking Press. If you’re an aspiring author, or if you’re interested in reading a novel written by a younger author, check out the titles on this inspired list of teen books written by teen authors, compiled by the Appleton Public Library (WI).
Are you a teen interested in writing? Check out Teen Ink, a teen literary magazine written by teens.
Have you written something you would like another author to critique? Teenfire has a Writer’s Forum where aspiring writers can both inspire readers & gain insight from authors, editors and their peers.

The complete list of Books by Teens for Teens can be found on page 56 of Read, Remember, Recommend for Teens: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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Minnesota Book Awards for Young People’s Literature – Teen Book Award Spotlight

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010
Each Wednesday, Bibliobabe spotlights an award or notable reading list. These lists are comprised of fiction and YA awards and important book lists, all part of the Read, Remember, Recommend for Teens reading journals. For past spotlights, click here.
This week’s spotlight is on The Minnesota Book Awards for Young People’s Literature
The Minnesota Book Award annually recognizes books that reflect a clear Minnesota influence or are written by Minnesota writers. Begun in 1988, they are now sponsored by the Friends of the St. Paul Public Library. Award category names have varied greatly over the years, and not all categories are included in the honors every year. The award for Young Adult literature may be given to a work of fiction, nonfiction, graphic novel, or poetry for teens or young adults.
The 2010 Young People’s Literature winner (just announced this week!) is The Magician’s Elephant, by Kate DiCamillo.

You can find the complete list of winners in:

The complete list of Minnesota Book Award winners for Young People’s Literature can be found on page 159 of Read, Remember, Recommend for Teens: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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Battle of the “Best Books” Lists – Notable List Spotlight

Wednesday, April 14th, 2010
Each Wednesday, Bibliobabe spotlights an award or notable reading list. These lists are comprised of fiction and YA awards and important book lists, all part of the Read, Remember, Recommend reading journals. For past spotlights, click here.
This week’s spotlight is on the different “Best Book Lists” inspired and including the Modern Library’s 100 Best Books of the Century list.
Modern Library: 100 Best Books of the Century
In July, 1998, Modern Library Publishers issued their “100 Best Books of the Century” list. The purpose for publishing this list was “to get people talking about great books.” More than 400,000 readers cast their votes online. The Modern Library List has spurred many “rival” lists, including the Radcliffe Publishing Course list of 100 best novels.

Radcliffe Publishing Course: 100 Best Novels of the Century
At the request of the Modern Library editorial board, the Radcliffe Publishing Course (now known as the Columbia Publishing Course) compiled and published a rival “100 Best Novels of the Century” list. According to the American Library Association, 42 of the books on the list have been targets of banning attempts.

Hungry Mind Review: 100 Best
As an alternative to the Modern Library’s top 100, the Hungry Mind Review (no longer published) published its own list of the 100 best twentieth-century books. The list was ocposed and reviewed by five writers: Mary Moore Easter, Heid E. Erdrich, Bill Holm, David Mura and George Rabasa. The selections were guided and directed by Bart Schneider, editor of the Hungry Mind Review, and J. Otil Powell of the Loft LIterary Center in MInneapolis. The Hungry Mind Review claimed its list, given in alphabetical order by author, “reflects a far more realistic race and gender balance.” It also included works of nonfiction, especially biography and autobiography.
Feminista Journal: 100 Best Female Writers of the 20st Century
The Feminista Journal (no longer published) also published a list in response to the Modern Library’s 100 Best. The Modern Library list was criticized for its limited selection of female authors and authors of color, as well as the fact that the selection panel was 90% male. Feminista noted that while the “Modern Library’s list features some extraordinary and wonderful works of fiction,” it was comprised of 92 male and 8 female authors. The Feminista list is unranked and made up entirely of female writers. The list was restricted to fiction and one work per author.

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Bellwether Prize for Fiction – Fiction Award Spotlight

Wednesday, April 7th, 2010
Each Wednesday, Bibliobabe spotlights an award or notable reading list. These lists are comprised of fiction and YA awards and important book lists, all part of the Read, Remember, Recommend reading journals. For past spotlights, click here.
This week’s spotlight is on The Bellwether Prize for Fiction
The Bellwether Prize for Fiction was founded and funded by author Barbara Kingsolver to support “literature of social change.” The $25,000 cash prize, awarded in even-numbered years to a previously unpublished novel, comes with a major publisher’s contract, including standard royalties. The Bellwether is unlike any other prize: it seeks to “advocate serious literary fiction that addresses issues of social justice and the impact of culture and politics on human relationships.” Qualifying manuscripts must show “outstanding literary merit” and “address contemporary or historical issues in a manner that advocates social responsibility” in the tradition of writers like Nadine Gordimer, Wole Soyinka, Toni Morrison, Harper Lee, and John Steinbeck. The prize board describes social responsibility as “a moral obligation of individuals to engage with their communities in ways that promote a more respectful coexistence.” To be eligible for the Bellwether, an author must be a U.S. citizen, with a publication record, whose book(s) have not previously sold more than 10,000 copies. Details may be obtained at http://www.bellwetherprize.org. Interested publishers may contact the Bellwether board through the NWUSO.
Past Winners
2008 The Girl Who Fell From the Sky, by Heidi Durrow
2006 Mudbound, by Hillary Jordan
2004 Correcting the Landscape, by Marjorie Kowalski Cole
2002 The Book of Dead Birds, by Gayle Brandeis
2000Kissing the Virgin’s Mouth, by Donna M. Gershten

You can find this list in:


All past winners of The Bellwether Prize as well as room for the next two winners can be found on page 69 of Read, Remember, Recommend: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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“30 Multicultural Books Every Teen Should Know” – Teen Notable List Spotlight

Wednesday, March 24th, 2010
Each Wednesday, Bibliobabe spotlights an award or notable reading list. These lists are comprised of fiction and YA awards and important book lists, all part of the Read, Remember, Recommend reading journals. For past spotlights, click here.
This week’s spotlight is on The Cooperative Children’s Book Center’s (CCBC) “30 Multicultural Books Every Teen Should Know”.
The CCBC is a “unique examination, study and research library of the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. A vital gathering place for books, ideas and expertise, the CCBC is committed to identifying excellent literature for children and adolescents and bringing this literature to the attention of those adults who have an academic, professional or career interest in connecting young readers with books.”
The CCBC defines multicultural literature as books by and about people of color: African and African Americans, American Indians, Asian/Pacific and Asian Pacific Americans, and Latinos.
The “30 Multicultural Books Every Teen Should Know” list offers a myriad of titles, including:

The CBCC offers an expansive list of books – other great book lists from the CBCC.

Looking for multicultural literature for younger readers? Check out 50 Multicultural Books Every Child Should Know. Interested in even more multicultural literature? Check out the Persons of Color Reading Challenge.

You can find the complete list of winners in:

The complete list of “30 Multicultural Books Every Teen Should Know” can be found on page 141 of Read, Remember, Recommend for Teens: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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The Cybils – Teen Award Spotlight

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

Each Wednesday, Bibliobabe spotlights an award or notable reading list. These lists are comprised of fiction and YA awards and important book lists that are all part of the Read, Remember, Recommend reading journals. For past spotlights, click here.

The Cybils (Children’s and Young Adult Bloggers Literary Awards) are quickly becoming one of the most anticipated awards for young adults.


In the words of Anne Levy, contest administrator of the Children’s and Young Adult Blogger’s Literary Awards, the purpose of the award is to “Reward the children’s and young adult authors…whose books combine the highest literary merit and ‘kid appeal’ and to foster a sense of community among bloggers who write about children’s and YA literature, highlight our best reviewers…(blogs) and provide a forum for the similarly obsessed.” This community of children’s and young adult book bloggers, aka the kidlitosphere, supports their own book awards with their time and talent; serving as panelists and judges.

Awards are given in nine genres of children’s and young adult literature: Easy Readers, Fantasy & Science Fiction, Fiction Picture Books, Graphic Novels, Middle Grade Novels, Non-Fiction Middle Grade/Young Adult Books, Non-Fiction Picture Books, Poetry, and Young Adult Novels. Books can be nominated by anyone, preceding the October 16th deadline.

The winners of the Cybils Award, which started in 2006, are announced annually on Valentine’s Day.

This month’s teen award spotlight is also the inspiration behind our teen free book giveaway choice: Cracked Up to Be, by Courtney Summers is the 2009 Cybil Winner for Young Adult Fiction.

For more Cybils fun, check out the Cyblis Reading Challenge, hosted by Galley Smith. Participants are encouraged to read from the Cybils Award nominees for the given year. Levels of participation vary. The challenge includes author interviews, guest posts, giveaways and a grand prize drawing for a $100 gift card to Borders Books.


You can find the complete list of winners in:

The complete list of Cybils Winners can be found on page 38 of Read, Remember, Recommend for Teens: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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The Tournament of Books (Rooster Award) – Award Spotlight

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010

The Tournament of Books is one of my favorite awards. It’s creative pairing of sixteen books against each other, the comical banter between the commentators and the insightful words of the judges makes for a exceptional two weeks of literary fun. And if you haven’t read all the finalists, these are some great recommendations.

The Morning News, on online literary publication has put on the Tournament of Books every year since 2005. With Powell’s Books of Portland Oregon and Field Notes as sponsors, the tournament identifies “16 of the most celebrated and highly touted novels of the year, seed[s] them in a March Madness-type bracket, conscript[s] them into a ‘Battle Royal of Literary Excellence,’ …and present[s] the author of the winning book a live rooster.” Literary figures, mostly eminent, some fringe, each name winners in the head-to-head matchups – and majority rules. For added excitement, a “zombie round” is introduced near the end of the tournament, in which two defeated books, determined by the online votes of ordinary readers, get a second chance. In honor of a favorite character in contemporary literature, David Sedaris’s brother, aka “The Rooster”, the winning author receives a live chicken. Discounted copies of all the contenders are for sale at Powell’s.

Here are the contenders for this year’s Tournament of Books:

For more information about the award, its judges, and to keep up all on the action, check out the official Tournament of Books site.


You can find this list in:


All 16 contenders and the winners of the Tournament of Books for the last five years can be found on page 125 of Read, Remember, Recommend: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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Pennie’s Picks, The Costco Connection – Notable List Spotlight

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010
Each Wednesday, Bibliobabe spotlights an award or notable reading list. These lists are comprised of fiction and YA awards and important book lists that are all part of the Read, Remember, Recommend reading journals. For past spotlights, click here.
This week’s spotlight is on the Pennie’s Pick list featured each month in the The Costco Connection magazine. The fiction book giveaway from Bibliobabe this month is the current Pennie’s Pick, The God of Animals, by Aryn Kyle.
Millions of Costco Wholesale members rely on the recommendations of book buyer Pennie Clark Ianniciello and her staff. Pennie picks one book each month to feature in The Costco Connection magazine, distributed to all Costco members. These selections, mostly fiction and usually trade paperbacks are the result of must debating by the Costco book buyers.
Over the years Pennie’s Picks have included a huge variety of fiction – brand new titles, older titles, books from small publishers, mysteries, chick lit, and great book club picks. In many cases, the titles on Pennie’s Picks lists become bestsellers. This was the story with both Cold Mountain, by Charles Frazier and Memoirs of a Geisha, by Arthur Golden. It is easy to say that Pennie Clark Ianniciello is the most influential woman in the book business today.
Here is a list of some of my favorite titles on the Pennie’s Pick list – many of which I would not have read if not for her pick.

You can find this list in:


The fiction selections of Pennie’s Picks for the past ten years, as well as room to enter the picks for the two next years can be found on page 88 of Read, Remember, Recommend: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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Salon Best Books of the Year – Notable List Spotlight

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010
Best fiction of 2009
The Children’s Book, by A.S. Byatt
Await Your Reply: A Novel, by Dan Chaon
Chronic City, by Jonathan Lethem
Love in Infant Monkeys: Stories, by Lydia Millet
The Little Stranger, by Sarah Waters
Laura Miller from Salon (Salon.com) has been publishing annual ‘best of’ lists since 1996 (sometimes with the help of other editors). These lists, out each December, encompass the five best fiction and the five best nonfiction titles of the previous year. What makes these lists unique, in my opinion, is that they are the tastes of one person (or two), instead of an organized group of critics sifting through the all the year’s titles. Don’t get me wrong; I am a HUGE fan of the institutions, organizations, periodicals and corporations who publish award and notable lists each year. But, the Salon list mixes that up a bit and adds some individual flavor. One person can only get through so many books in one year, and the reasons for choosing books to read is as various as the titles, resulting in a interesting list of bests. Another reason I like Laura’s list is that there are usually books (or at least authors) I have read (and usually loved) and books and authors I am not familiar with. Everything I have read from suggestions on Laura’s lists have been exceptional – she is a great resource.
The Best Fiction Books of 2009 list looks like another great mix to dive into. I really enjoyed Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem and with Laura’s vote, Chronic City is now on my TBR pile. By chance, I stumbled upon Fingersmith by Sarah Waters a few years and love it. I have also heard good things about Night Watch, written between the two previous titles. A. S. Byatt’s Possession was a little hard to get into, but I’m glad I persevered. I’m definitely going to give The Children’s Book a gander. As an avid reader, it is hard to admit not being familiar with some authors, but both Dan Chaon and Lydia Millet were new names to me. This is exciting though – more reading lines to tap into.
Over the last thirteen years, Miller’s lists have included such great titles as 2666, Tree of Smoke, Then We Came to the End, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, On Beauty, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell, Cold Mountain, Plainsong and The Corrections, while also featuring some lesser recognized titles, such as Amalgamation Polka, The Bug, Lying Awake and Thirst.

This past December, Laura also posted her picks for Best books of the decade.

You can find this list in:


The complete Salon Best Fiction Books list can be found on page 82 of Read, Remember, Recommend: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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National Book Awards – Award Spotlight

Friday, February 5th, 2010

Each month, I highlight one book award and one notable list from my journal series, Read, Remember, Recommend. This month, I am giving away Let the Great World Spin, by Colum McCann – the 2009 National Book Award winner, so I thought February would be the perfect month to highlight the National Book Award.

The National Book Awards, including the Award for Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Young People’s Literature, are given annually in November to American authors for books published the prior year. The purpose of these awards, created in 1950 by a group of publishers, is “to enhance the public’s awareness of exceptional books… and to increase
the popularity of reading in general.” The mission of the National Book Foundation is “to celebrate the best of American literature, to expand its audience, and to enhance the cultural value of good writing in America.” Award categories have varied over the years, but now include nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature. For each genre, an independent five-judge panel selects the winner. Each winner receives a bronze sculpture and $10,000. In certain years, two awards were given in fiction, sometimes to honor publications in both hardcover and paperback. More information for both awards can be found at National Book Foundation.

National Book Award for Fiction

The 2009 Fiction winner: Let the Great World Spin, by Column McCann
Colum McCann’s acceptance speech (as well as speeches from all finalists) can be seen here: NBA Speeches.
The 2009 National Book Award Fiction Award finalists:
American Salvage, by Bonnie Jo Campbell
In Other Rooms, Other Wonders, byDaniyal Mueenuddin
Lark and Termite, Jayne Anne Phillips
Far North, by Marcel Theroux

National Book Award for Young People’s Literature

The 2009 Young People’s Literature winner: Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Phillip Hoose.
The 2009 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature finalists:
Charles and Emma: The Darwins’ Leap of Faith, by Deborah Heiligman
Stitches, by David Small
Lips Touch: Three Times, by Laini Taylor
Jumped, by Rita Williams-Garcia

You can find these lists in:


The complete National Book Award winners for Fiction as well as the finalists from 1990 can be found on page 19 of Read, Remember, Recommend: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers. The National Book Award for Poetry can be found on page 26.
The complete list of National Book Award winners for Young People’s Literature can be found on page 11 of Read, Remember, Recommend for Teens: A Reading Journal for Book Lovers.

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